soil

Green Planet Garden

ROCKDUST COMPOST SOIL MINERALES

Rockdust and its benefits to soil

TINCIDUNT SITAM

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20 kg plastsække

kr. 249,- inkl. moms

kr. 49,- inkl. moms

REMINERALIZES

 

Now “remineralization” of the soil is gaining attention as a necessary step to reintroduce vital minerals and trace elements into our growing medium. Compost is the basis for good healthy soil. Over the years, minerals and trace elements are farmed out of the soil, resulting in less productive crops and less nutritional food.

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Why should we remineralize our soil to ensured the optimal benefits from our foods

 

Rockdust feeds the plants which inturn takes up the minerals which we and animals eat.

These days we hear a lot about the importance of organic farming methods to replenish the soil with nutrients that can be lost over time.

Adding compost to a garden, for example, can replenish some of these nutrients.

Now “remineralization” of the soil is gaining attention as a necessary step to reintroduce vital minerals and trace elements into our growing medium. Compost is the basis for good healthy soil. Over the years, minerals and trace elements are farmed out of the soil, resulting in less productive crops and less nutritional food. Consider: That carrot you munch on has 10 to 25 percent fewer vitamins and minerals than a carrot did 25 years ago.Today, the major attention in policy areas as diverse as climate change, resource management and the many links between human diet and health are focusing attention on new ways of protecting our environment and human welfare. Soil remineralization may have the potential to contribute to reducing carbon in our atmosphere by increasing the potential to lock more carbon into soils and biomass.

By co-utilising rock dusts with composted organic wastes to create alternative soil fertility systems we could maximise the value-added market potential for these composts in areas of large scale usage such as agriculture, thus avoiding the environmental and social impacts of landfilling these wastes. Their use could potentially reduce diffuse pollution from agricultural systems, particularly in sensitive areas and they may also create a valuable edge to the growing organics production sector as the connection between the health of our soils and the nutritional value of the foods they produce becomes better understood.